Wednesday, 8 July 2015

Review 4. The Changeling by Helen Falconer

Title: The Changeling
Author: Helen Falconer
Publisher: Corgi Childrens
Published: June 4th 2015
Pages: 496

"Aoife is an ordinary teenager, hanging out with her childhood friend Carla, putting up with school. The worst she has to contend with is that the boy of Carla’s dreams is trying to get off with her instead. But then, after chasing a lost little girl no one seems to be able to see, Aoife starts to develop mysterious powers. Eventually her parents confess that she isn’t their real daughter. Their human child was stolen by the fairies, and Aoife is the changeling left behind in her place. Shocked and disorientated, Aoife turns to Shay, the taciturn farmer’s son who is the only person who might believe her story. Together, they embark on a dangerous journey, which takes them deep into the underworld and changes everything they thought they knew about fairies.."

Review:

It’s impossible not to fall in love with the magic sceneries of “The Changeling”. Ireland is a beautiful country and Helen Falconer describes it perfectly. And the fairy world was certainly a paradise. More gorgeous sceneries! And magical and interesting creatures. And the research the author did about the fairies was very good. I always enjoy reading about the different kind of fairies.
I can’t say I liked the fairies which lived in this supposed “paradise”. Ultan was very likable, but Caitlin was just annoying – her attitude just made me want to choke her! Should I give her a break because of her past? Maybe, but her behavior and lies were a bit too much when we have a world with characters perfectly flawed. 
Shay was probably my favourite character. His faith in Aoife and his connection with the fairies made him an interesting character. Also, his relation with his older brother... I just wanted to hug him and tell him everything would be okay.

I enjoyed the first part of the story a lot more than I liked the second one. I confess I was bit disappointed with it. The last chapters were very fast-paced; everything happened so fast that I had to ask myself if I was missing something. I wish the revelation of the big villain hadn’t been done so fast as I felt something missed. Hopefully, the next book will develop the villain because he seemed a one-dimensional character.
The biggest let down for me was the insta-love. It needs to stop! At a moment, Aofie didn’t like Shay because he had never spoken a word to her, but two days later she regretted not saying that she loved him back when she thought they were dying.
I recommend this book to young readers who enjoy fairies and magic - and when I say young readers, I mean very young.

I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you.

Waiting on Wednesday - A Whole New World

"Waiting on Wednesday" is a weekly meme hosted by Breaking the Spine that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating.

This week on WoW is A Whole New World by Liz Braswell. I know this book has been receiving bad reviews, but I still want to give it an opportunity. If I hate it then... oh, well, I probably already read worse books. The book will be released on September 1st.

 

Buy The Book Now at The Book Depository, Free Delivery World Wide
"Welcome to a new YA series that reimagines classic Disney stories in surprising new ways. Each book asks the question: What if one key moment from a familiar Disney film was changed? This dark and daring version of Aladdin twists the original story with the question: What if Jafar was the first one to summon the Genie?

When Jafar steals the Genie’s lamp, he uses his first two wishes to become sultan and the most powerful sorcerer in the world. Agrabah lives in fear, waiting for his third and final wish.To stop the power-mad ruler, Aladdin and the deposed Princess Jasmine must unite the people of Agrabah in rebellion. But soon their fight for freedom threatens to tear the kingdom apart in a costly civil war.

What happens next? A Street Rat becomes a leader. A princess becomes a revolutionary. And readers will never look at the story of Aladdin in the same way again."
From Goodreads